Tag Archives: Tatiana Pentes

Scenes From A Shanghai Hotel: cabaret neon

Image from SCENES FROM A SHANGHAI HOTEL
An experimental film by Geoffrey Weary. Production Company: Strange Cities Productions
Director/Producer: Geoffrey Weary
Produced in association with Screen Australia (AFC)
Cast: Tatiana Pentes, Rose Tang

SCENES FROM A SHANGHAI HOTEL
An experimental film by Geoffrey Weary

TIME WAS…….
Geoffrey Weary 


SCA Galleries
Sydney College of the Arts
University of Sydney, AUSTRALIA


PORTRAITS 

Production Company: Strange Cities Productions
Director/Producer: Geoffrey Weary
Produced in association with Screen Australia (AFC)

Cast: Tatiana Pentes, Leakhena Sy, Rose Tang

PORTRAITS is an experimental digital work that explores three contrasting experiences of war and conflict in the middle and late 20th century. A woman living in Shanghai is expelled from China after the Communist Revolution in 1949. The ghosts of the Cold War appear and disappear in the crumbling ruins of the Berlin Wall in 1990. A young woman suffers a crisis of identity around the circumstances of her birth at the end of the war in Cambodia in 1978


SCENES FROM A SHANGHAI HOTEL

An experimental film by Geoffrey Weary

A Russian woman living in Shanghai is expelled from China after the Communist Revolution in 1949. Her story begins in a hotel room in Shanghai and ends on a suburban street in Sydney, Australia. Performative, fictional, and documentary elements are blended into a work that is suggestive and open to multiple readings. Extensive use of film leader and scratchy film surfaces add to the sense that what we are seeing resembles something that is illusive, dream-like, just beyond grasp…..or is it just a newsreel playing in someone’s head? Cast: Rose Tang and Tatiana Pentes


CAPTIVE

An experimental film by Geoffrey Weary

CAPTIVE explores the themes of repression, confinement and escape. These themes are expressed through the incorporation of grainy VHS footage shot in Berlin at the time of the collapse of the Berlin Wall, hand-held camera sequences shot in a maze-like forest and slices of footage composited out of archival Cold War films. As the real historical Wall crumbles under the blows of street hawkers and souvenir hunters, ghostly specters from the past appear then dissolve back into the scratchy surface of a long forgotten newsreel.

Captive by Geoffrey Weary from Strange Cities Productions on Vimeo.


My Mother Told Me

An experimental film by Geoffrey Weary

A young woman tells the story of her family’s destruction during the war in Cambodia, 1975-1978. Later as a refugee living with her mother in Sydney, Australia she suffers an identity crisis that is linked to the unexplained circumstances of her birth and the mystery of the father that she has never known. Cast: Leakhena Sy

My Mother Told Me by Geoffrey Weary from Strange Cities Productions on Vimeo.
My Mother Told Me

Australia’s audiovisual heritage online Australian Screen http://aso.gov.au/titles/shorts/my-mother-told-me/

#GirlOnATrain

Images: Geoffrey Weary & Tatiana Pentes, Performance: Jing Feng (Sophy Feng) & found home movie footage

OBJECT Magazine: Australian Design Centre: articles by Tatiana Pentes

OBJECT Magazine: published by the Australian Design Centre
http://www.object.com.au/object-magazine/current-issue/

Tatiana TatianaPentes_Project_Object_ OBJECT_ CfCC_Vol2_1997
Tatiana Pentes, Project: Object a jewellery/object installation, OBJECT Magazine, Issue 2 1997

Tatiana Pentes, Project: Object a jewellery/object installation, OBJECT Magazine, Issue 2 1997

 

Tatiana Pentes, Goddess, (contemporary ceramics), OBJECT Magazine, Issue 2 1995
Tatiana Pentes, The Body in Pain, (jewellery/textiles/performance),OBJECT Magazine, Issue 1 1995

Tatiana Pentes, The Body in Pain, (jewellery/textiles/performance),OBJECT Magazine, Issue 1 1995

 

 

Tatiana Pentes, s Tension and Allure, Program: Mentorship Object Studios, OBJECT Magazine, Issue 4, 1999
Tatiana Pentes, Tension and Allure, Program: Mentorship Object Studios, OBJECT Magazine, Issue 4, 1999

Tatiana Pentes, Tension and Allure, Program: Mentorship Object Studios, OBJECT Magazine, Issue 4, 1999

 

 

Tatiana Pentes, Goddess, (contemporary ceramics), OBJECT Magazine, Issue 2 1995
Tatiana Pentes, Goddess, (contemporary ceramics), OBJECT Magazine, Issue 2 1995

Tatiana Pentes, Goddess, (contemporary ceramics), OBJECT Magazine, Issue 2 1995

 

 

Tatiana Pentes, Designing the Future, (EcoDesign), OBJECT Magazine, Issue 2, 1994
Tatiana Pentes, Designing the Future, (EcoDesign), OBJECT Magazine, Issue 2, 1994

Tatiana Pentes, Designing the Future, (EcoDesign), OBJECT Magazine, Issue 2, 1994

 

 

Tatiana Pentes, The Devil Gets All the Tunes Wrong, OBJECT Magazine, Issue 1, 1994
Tatiana Pentes, The Devil Gets All the Tunes Wrong, OBJECT Magazine, Issue 1, 1994

Tatiana Pentes, The Devil Gets All the Tunes Wrong, OBJECT Magazine, Issue 1, 1994

Geoff Weary’s film ‘An Eye for An I’, The Third Wave: Two Decades of the Hill End Artists Exhibition 1 Aug – 28 Sept 2014 Bathurst Regional Art Gallery

Hill_End_BRAG2014‘An Eye for An I’, film on video 3mins
Writer/Director/Producer: Geoffrey Weary
Model: Tatiana Pentes

The Third Wave: Two Decades of the Hill End Artists in Residence Exhibition 1 Aug – 28 Sept 2014 Bathurst Regional Art Gallery

1 AUGUST – 28 SEPTEMBER 2014
http://www.bathurstart.com.au/images/stories/2014/slot_4/3rd_wave_Room_Sheet.pdf

“…landscape architect and film-maker, Gavin Wilson, was researching the artistic heritage of Hill End and the region for his 1995 exhibition The Artists of Hill End: Art, Life and Landscape for the Art Gallery of NSW. Aware of Bellette’s bequest, and withthe support of Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, Evans Shire Council and the National Parks and Wildlife Service, Wilson invited a third wave of artists to respond to Hill End. Contemporary artists including Richard Goodwin, Anton James, Tom Spence, Wendy Sharpe, Peter Wright, Geoff Weary, Peter Kingston, Mandy Barrett, Emma Walker and James Rogers participated in a series of pilot residencies at Haefligers Cottage in 1994 and 1995. Works from these residencies were exhibited alongside historic works in The Artists of Hill End exhibition at the Art Gallery of NSW.

“The historic Haefliger Cottage at Hill End and the spectacular surrounding scenery are prividing an ideal location for artist in residency, Geoffrey Weary, who is finding it a welcome respite from Sydney. Mr Weary, who describes himself as a video artists also working with more ‘traditional’ mediums, is the latest participant….Hill End artist in resident, Geoffrey Weary and Tatiana Pentes who are, living and working with the spirit of Paul Haefliger and Jean Bellette in the famous Haefligger Cottage…The house has all their things still intact, the cottage is pretty much as they left it…” in  Inspiration For Visiting Artist: Hill End Artist Residency: Geoffrey Weary: Bathurst Regional Art Gallery Advocate, 24 January 1995.

HillEndResidency002Photograph: Geoffrey Weary & Tatiana Pentes

The foundations of the Hill End Artists in Residence Program were laid. In 1999, under the auspices of Bathurst City Council and Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, the Program was officially launched. In 2002 Murrays Cottage was refurbished with the assistance of the NSW Ministry for the Arts and added as a new studio residence alongside Haefligers Cottage in 2003.Since 1994, a total of 283 residencies have been awarded to artists from a diverse range of disciplines including painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, ceramics, textiles, new media, writing, animation, film, sound and performance. Over 150 works by 70 of the artists participating in the Program have entered the collection through donation and purchase. The selection presented here represents just a small portion of the work produced in response to the landscape, history and heritage of Hill End.”

http://www.bathurstart.com.au/exhibitions/current/39-exhibitions/current/352-3rd-wave.html

“Celebrating 20 years of the Hill End Artists in Residence Program,works in this exhibition are drawn entirely from BRAG’s permanent collection. Featured artists include Jean Bellette, Ray Crooke, Russell Drysdale, Donald Friend, Ben Quilty, David Strachan, Rosemary Valadon, Greg Weight and Nicole Welch. A Bathurst Regional Art Gallery exhibition.”

345The studio at the historic Haefliger Cottage

Catalogue Essay, ‘Geoffrey Weary’s Floating World’, ACADEMICI, Roma, 2005

Screenshot 2014-09-07 11.24.02Catalogue Essay, ‘Geoffrey Weary’s Floating World’, ACADEMICI: Academy Gallery, British School at Rome, The Australia Council Visual Arts/Crafts Board Rome Studio Residency 1999-2004, Monash University, Australia Council for the Arts 2005 p38-39 ISBN: 0-9756060-7-7

Text: Tatiana Pentes

MONASH Catalogues: http://www.artdes.monash.edu.au/gallery/catalogues.php#
GeoffreyWearyFLOATINGWORLGeoff Weary, prints 8 and 9 from the series: TIME WAS…, 2003, digital prints on photographic paper, 200cm x 100cm each. Image courtesy of the artist

And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise, she took of the fruit thereof, and did eat…And the eyes of them both were opened… Old Testament, Genesis Chapter 2: 6 & 7

A sublime female body descends from the heavens, illumined upon the black painterly digital surface. These selected prints from Geoffrey Weary’s photographic series

TIME WAS…emerged from his residency at the British School at Rome, in 2000.

Exploring notions of the flow of time through cinematic representations of the human form, the artist presents and reveals both the precious object and the visceral shape of the corpus. The images represent the flow of time in the photographic realm. Time passing through and enveloping the body in frozen motion. The concealed female form transforms and reveals a knowing subject. The dualism of the clothed and the unclothed woman allegorise for the viewer the Biblical myth of the Fall. However, the artist transcends this idea through the repetitive exploration of these motifs, exemplified in this series.

Weary’s practice in the field of video art has shifted in the taking up of creative new media technologies and multimedia processes, to incorporate digital media, photomedia collage, where photography alchemically mingles the interplay of historical visual traditions: referencing sequential narrative film, modernist expressionist picture space, and the dark void of mannerist aesthetics. In a self-reflexive mode, Weary calls attention to the materiality of the paint on canvas

and pixels, the legacy of early avant-garde experiments. However, in true multimedia fashion, the fusion of stylistic impulses coalesce on his electronic surfaces, forming both abstract and figurative motifs, the convergence of art historical traditions, media types and knowledge.

And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.
And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. Old Testament, Genesis Chapter 1: 3 & 4.
From the darkness emerges the virtual play of light sources, signifying the shift from perspectival representation to the creation of an imaginary horizon, floating world.

Tatiana Pentes Doctor of Creative Arts (Digital Media) Communications, University of Technology, Sydney, 2006.

Screenshot 2014-09-07 12.39.06